In Motion

Where does one begin remembering moments of learning? How does one pin-point that moment of change?

Postman & Weingartner (1975) stated that one could only learn in relation to what one already knew. In their view, knowledge is an outcome of perception. I have often been riddled by that critical moment of change; When is a perception altered? When has knowing  become knowledge? When does the moment of learning actually occur? And which level of learning does one refer to?

There are different learning models and theories where I could turn to and attempt a dissection of my own learning. However, for the moment that would not make much sense. For without a specific context, how could I speak of learning moments? The challenges and implications of learning  how to sail, for instance, are different to those when learning a language or playing a musical instrument. Yes, there are features which overlap – practice, dedication, correction, passion and pleasure in the process of learning and the desire of specific outcomes.

Yet outcomes are a possible consequence of learning and not the learning itself. Learning, simply put, is  change, with the pain and pleasures of the process itself.

Perhaps because I’m having a busy week, I find that the video below expresses my stories of learning better than words may capture them at the moment. Words of theories and social contexts may follow in time.

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2 thoughts on “In Motion

  1. Hi Ana Cristina. Another rich post. I like the fact that you contrast different types of learning in different contexts, languages v sailing v playing an instrument. I think there are some differences between skills and cognition and – as Dean and I have been discussing – what we even mean when we use the term learning. What does it mean to ‘know’ a language, to ‘know’ how to play a musical instrument and to ‘know’ algebra?
    This then brings in the role of formal and informal learning as well of course.
    I do agree though – this is all about change. Yes indeed, – and change is often painful.

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